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How do we see beyond the resume during recruitment efforts?

How do we see beyond the resume during recruitment efforts?

McGinty, Mac 002293821.2

There are two areas of evaluation in the recruitment process: 1) Are they qualified to do the job? 2) How will they fit into our organization’s culture? I’ll leave the latter to your judgement. But, the former comes with its own set of challenges.

It’s unfortunate, but increasingly candidates have started “enhancing” their resumes to convey experience or technical skills they do not have. This can make finding qualified candidates even more difficult. Extensive interviews can reveal weak skill sets if they are focused enough, but many know the buzz words and can easily hold a conversation about a topic in which they have no real experience.

School records can reflect academic exposure to certain topics, but not necessarily guarantee how much of that knowledge was retained. Candidates can know the concepts that are required for success, but sometimes are unable to implement them when the moment presents itself. This becomes a problem when they arrive on the job and require significant additional training (or worse yet, turn over).

As a result, many employers are putting more weight in industry certifications. They incorporate requirements in the job description and recruitment process for candidates who have been assessed by a third party and have earned their industry credential. By receiving this credential, employers can be assured that the candidate is knowledgeable in the field to which they are applying.

For example, a career studies degree in welding is beneficial, but an American Welding Society (AWS) Certification is an additional assurance that the welder has the capability to do quality work in their field. In turn, the credential holder can have more confidence in his/her skill set and success in the position. Similarly, an Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) certification documents that an individual is has industry recognized skills at servicing and maintaining a vehicle, as well as a Project Management Professional (PMP) Certification demonstrates that an individual has a certain level of expertise and skills in project management.

Dr. Glenn DuBois, Chancellor of the Virginia Community College System, recently acknowledged the importance of these credentials in his Richmond-Times Dispatch editorial article. He stated, “The industry-recognized credentials at the heart of this matter open doors to many of Virginia’s fastest-growing and most highly demanded jobs.”

Most candidates have figured out that the resume is a “door opener” with a single objective of securing an in-person interview. Employers should take that same perspective. In the final analysis, all recruitment efforts should incorporate a balance of credentials, education attainment, experience (documented with employer [not personal] references), and the interview process itself.

Mac McGinty, vice president of Community College Workforce Alliance, has been providing workforce services for Virginia’s Community Colleges for 20 years.

Knowing that the training of workforce is crucial to productivity, job satisfaction, and profitability and that well-focused development provides a positive return-on-investment, he is heavily involved in numerous community, regional and statewide workforce development efforts.

An editorial from Mac McGinty, Vice President of CCWA
Richmond Times-Dispatch, April 30, 2015

Mac McGinty has been providing workforce services for Virginia’s Community Colleges for 20 years. Knowing that the training of workforce is crucial to productivity, job satisfaction, and profitability and that well-focused development provides a positive return-on-investment, he is heavily involved in numerous community, regional and statewide workforce development efforts.

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