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2018 LogistXGames

2018 LogistXGames

FOURTH ANNUAL RICHMOND LOGISTXGAMES  TO BE HELD THURSDAY, APRIL 26

Logistics companies set to participate in friendly competition highlighting supply chain and logistics industry

(Henrico, Va.) – Greater Richmond, with its thriving distribution and warehousing industries, will play host to the 2018 RVA LogistXGames as ten local companies compete for the fourth annual regional championship.

“Last year’s games turned the spotlight onto the logistics and distribution industry in Richmond, and we will continue to do so, that’s why we’re encouraging participating and sponsorship for this year’s games,” said CBRE |Richmond Vice President and LogistXGames co-chair Wood Thornton.

The 2018 RVA LogistXGames will be held at Deepwater Industrial Park at 3205 Commerce Road on April 26 (10:00am to 1:00pm).

The games serve as a healthy competition between prominent companies who are involved in the movement of goods between source and consumer, and paths all along the way. Representatives of CBRE |Richmond, Liberty Property Trust, the Community College Workforce Alliance (CCWA), and The Port of Virginia have organized this event.

How do the games work?

There are four events in the 2018 competition. They are each designed to test the teamwork, talent, efficiency and speed of each competing company. The games mirror the types of environments which logistics professionals work, but they are presented with a “twist.” Those games are:

  • Pallet Puzzle Sprint – Three-person teams each take 36 different-sized corrugated boxes from floor locations, assemble them and stack them on a pallet. The team with the quickest time wins.
  • Pallet Jack Relay – Three-person teams participate in a timed pallet jack relay race through an obstacle course while keeping the boxes on the pallet.
  • Pick/Pack Hurdle – Three-person teams move boxes from the pallet to a warehouse racking system while memorizing positioning and SKUs in a timed race.
  • Box Put –Teams will have packed one box with fragile bottled liquid items, in the Pallet Puzzle Sprint event, utilizing selected packaging material from various options. During the Box Put event, one team member will then throw the box for distance and accuracy without breaking the contents.

An objective group of volunteers will serve as judges for the competition. The winning company will receive the “Golden Pallet” award.

Why Hold the LogistXGames?

First held in 2007 in Louisville, Ky., the games were created as a means for participating companies to build employee pride, foster teamwork principles and reinforce safety standards.

Teams playing, as of April 18, 2018, include:

  • CCWA
  • Riverside Logistics
  • McKesson
  • The Port of Virginia
  • Worth Higgins & Associates
  • Total Packaging Services
  • AutoPartSource
  • Lutron
  • PD Systems
  • Goodwill

Sponsors include: CBRE|Richmond, The Port of Virginia, Virginia Credit Union Arbon|Rite Hite, Panattoni, Capital Region Workforce Development Board, Becknell Industrial, Liberty Property Trust, Alpha Systems, Chesterfield Economic Development, Crown Lifts, Dominion Energy, Greater Richmond Partnership, Hanover County Economic Development Authority, Henrico County Economic Development Authority, Hood Container, Hourigan Development, Lutron, Manufacturing Skills Institute, Peaklogix, Potbelly Sandwich Shop, Richmond Economic Development Authority, Riverside Logistics, SignCrafters, TK Promotions, Total Packaging Services, Williams Mullen and Worth Higgins & Associates. Tax deductible contributions will be designated for workforce development efforts including logistics/operation management industry training offered by CCWA.

For more information about the 2018 RVA LogistXGames, call/email Laura Bradshaw at (804) 267-7253 (laura.bradshaw@cbre-richmond.com) or Nina Sims at (804) 523-2289 (nsims@ccwa.vccs.edu).


To join us in person, register here:

About CBRE – Richmond

CBRE|Richmond is a CBRE, Inc. affiliate office serving the Central Virginia region. The firm assists real estate owners, investors and occupiers by offering strategic advice and execution for property leasing and sales; property, facilities and project management; corporate services; debt and equity financing; investment management; valuation and appraisal; research and investment strategy; and consulting. In 2017, the Richmond office completed 390 lease transactions encompassing 5.8 million square feet totaling $364 million, and 89 sales transactions valuing $435 million. For more information about the Richmond office, visit www.cbre.us/richmond.

About Community College Workforce Alliance (CCWA)

The Community College Workforce Alliance (CCWA) is building the region’s workforce as a partnership between J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College and John Tyler Community Colleges – serving four cities and 12 counties of Central Virginia. The organization provides non-credit training, customized instruction, consulting and educational programs for more than 10,000 class participants representing over 900 employers in the region annually. CCWA coordinates at three training facilities in the region (Henrico, Midlothian and Chester), online and at the job sites of employers. Visit www.ccwatraining.org for more information on courses and services.

Media Contacts:

Nina Sims
Director, Marketing
Community College Workforce Alliance (CCWA)
O: (804) 523-2289; C: (804) 356-3962
nsims@ccwa.vccs.edu

 

Laura Bradshaw
Brokerage Coordinator
CBRE | Richmond
O: (804) 267-7253; C: (804) 605-3702
laura.bradshaw@cbre-richmond.com

Bridge To Career – Preparing Young Adults for In-Demand Careers

Bridge To Career – Preparing Young Adults for In-Demand Careers

Community College Workforce Alliance (CCWA), Reynolds and John Tyler Community Colleges, Capital and Crater Regions’ Adult Education programs, and Goodwill of Central and Coastal Virginia are partnering to increase opportunities for young adults to rapidly gain the basic skills and credentials needed for readily available jobs offering career and wage growth.

Our new “Bridge to Career” programs in the Greater Richmond and Crater regions provide FREE conveniently-scheduled training for occupations in demand by regional business and industry. Programs also include: basic skills, career coaching, preparation for interviews and employment, opportunities to earn industry certifications, digital literacy, and assistance finding the transportation and services participants might need to get to training and work. Participants also have placement specialists working with them to secure employment at the program’s end.

Currently offered programs train students for careers in health care, warehousing and distribution, customer service and construction occupations. Cohorts begin year-round. Programs are available for those with and without a high school diploma. Thanks to funding by the Strada Education Network, there is no charge for tuition, fees, books or supplies.

For more information on the program, please complete the form below:

CCWA on RVA Today

CCWA on RVA Today

Elizabeth Creamer, CCWA’s Vice President of Workforce Development and Credential Attainment, explained programs, services and the significance of credentials in a recent interview at NBC12. In the past year, CCWA has awarded more than 1,000 industry certificates – allowing individuals a pathway to new careers and filling the pipeline for many employers.  Watch the interview here.

Learn more about certification programs by visiting http://ccwatraining.org/certifications/

Get Assistance to Earn Industry Credentials – A third of the cost for Professional Certificates

Get Assistance to Earn Industry Credentials – A third of the cost for Professional Certificates

CCWA offers 10 workforce credential grant programs as announced in the Governor’s release below. Governor McAuliffe Announces Workforce Grant Program and speaks to how “Credentials Will Open Doors to Promising, High-Demand Career Opportunities.”

Learn more about CCWA’s Certificate Programs.

Governor McAuliffe Announces Workforce Grant Program

~ Credentials Will Open Doors to Promising, High-Demand Career Opportunities~

RICHMOND – Governor Terry McAuliffe today announced the launch of a new grant program designed to ensure that workforce credentials are accessible and affordable for Virginians seeking the skills they need to obtain good-paying jobs in high-demand fields.

The New Economy Workforce Industry Credentials Grant program covers 124 different community college training programs at Virginia’s Community Colleges geared toward providing workforce credentials at one-third of their former cost.

“This program establishes a first-in-the-nation performance funding formula to create and sustain a supply of credentialed workers who meet the needs identified by our business leaders,” said Governor McAuliffe. “This week’s launch is the culmination of many months of hard work by public and private sector partners, all of us working together to ensure that Virginia has a 21st century workforce with the skills and experience to compete in today’s global economy.”

Virginia’s Community Colleges consulted with Virginia businesses to develop the list of eligible credentials that can provide access to a wide variety of high-demand jobs, such as certified welder, electrician, medical records tech, computer network specialist, pharmacy tech, digital security specialist, emergency medical tech, industrial machinery mechanic, dental assistant, and commercial truck driver.  The Virginia Board of Workforce Development identified more than 170 in-demand jobs aligned with the Commonwealth’s economic development targets for which Virginians can prepare through the new workforce program.

These are jobs that require specific skills, but not necessarily a traditional college degree. Community Colleges are making it even easier to earn workforce credentials by developing new programs and adding classes and locations for increased convenience.

“To create the skilled workforce the Commonwealth needs now and in the future, we need more options for training and credentialing that work for Virginians of all ages and life circumstances,” said Secretary of Commerce and Trade Maurice Jones. “With the New Economy Workforce Credentials program, for the first time, we have new options for workforce training and development that promptly get trainees into the skilled labor force.”

Research indicates that these workforce credentials are in high demand across Virginia and will be for the foreseeable future. The company Burning Glass produced a recent report indicating that there were more than 175,000 job vacancies for so-called middle-skill occupations last year in Virginia – the types of jobs that typically require some type of credential. The jobs paid more than $28 per hour (or more than $58,500 per year). According to the research, the jobs went unfilled for an average period of 26 days, which is longer than the national average. As a result, Virginia businesses lost 36.4 million hours of productivity. Virginia families lost more than $1 billion in potential wages, and Virginia’s General Fund lost more than $54.3 million in revenue.

Other studies predict that Virginia will have to fill more than 1.4 million jobs over the next decade. As many as two-thirds of those positions will require postsecondary level workforce credentials.

“The New Economy Workforce Industry Credentials Grant program will be a game changer for the Commonwealth,” said Secretary of Education Dietra Trent. “The in-depth research that has gone into establishing this innovative program will help us to increase access and success in higher education, especially for some of our most underserved populations.”

Students enrolling in one of the workforce credential training programs covered by the new grants will pay only one-third of the normal cost. Program costs vary widely, depending on the length and complexity of the training. For a list of programs covered by the grants, visit this link on the VCCS website.

The maximum value of each grant is $3,000. For example, a student who enrolls in and successfully completes a grant-eligible program that normally costs $4,500 will now pay $1,500, and the grant covers $3,000 of the cost. Additional financial aid can offset that cost even further. More information is available at the workforce development offices of Virginia’s Community Colleges.

Governor McAuliffe won bipartisan support this year among Virginia lawmakers for funding to enable approximately 10,000 Virginians to receive Workforce Credentials Grants for training costs over the next two years. This unique performance-based funding model is the first in the nation. Further, it represents the first significant public funding for workforce training programs in the 50-year history of Virginia’s Community Colleges.

“These workforce credentials increasingly represent the American Dream in the 21st century,” said Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges. “Individuals earn these credentials in weeks and months, not semesters and years. Those students are often quickly employed by businesses hungry for their skills. And they accomplish all that without piling on a decade’s worth of student debt.”

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve approximately 400,000 students each year.  For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu. To share a story about how community colleges change lives, visit 50.vccs.edu.

The Hows and Whys of Workplace Assessments

The Hows and Whys of Workplace Assessments

According to the Society for Human Resource Management, the assessment industry has been growing by 10 percent for the last several years. The rise in popularity of assessments can be attributed to several factors, not the least of which is summed up in Will Brooks’ recent Association for Talent Development blog post, “Let’s be honest: people love learning about themselves.” Self-awareness as well as a greater understanding of others has the potential to have a significant impact on performance and productivity.

There is another side to the rise in popularity of assessments, though. The plethora of assessment tools to choose from can be overwhelming: behavioral assessments, personality assessments, and cognitive ability assessments. Understanding what each assessment measures and what business need you are trying to address are key to selecting the right tool. That’s where CCWA can help!

CCWA offers an array of assessments including:

  • Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI®)
  • DiSC Assessment
  • Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode Instrument
  • Conflict Dynamics Profile
  • StrengthsFinder
  • Emotional Intelligence (EQ)
  • Team Dimensions Profile (CARE Profile)
  • Career Readiness Certificate (CRC)*

*Did you know that many organizations in the Greater Richmond area use the CRC as part of their hiring process? The CRC measures competencies in the areas of reading for information, applied mathematics, and locating information. Call us today if you’re interested in learning more about this assessment tool!

CCWA works closely with clients, listening to your goals, and asking the questions that uncover the real business needs. When we recommend an assessment tool, we also provide an instructor or coach who has an in-depth knowledge of that tool to assist you and your team with interpreting the results and understanding how to use them to improve team performance, develop leadership talent, or enhance individual performance.

In addition to helping our clients understand how to use workplace assessments, we also advise how not to use them. Assessments should not be used as stand-alone indicators of behavior or performance. Instead, they should be used in conjunction with other performance measurements, observations, and maybe even other assessments. As one of our instructors recently said to a class of senior leaders, “Making decisions based solely on an employee’s DiSC profile is like sitting in the cockpit of a 747 and only using the altimeter to fly it.”


If you’re trying to navigate the maze of workplace assessments, choose CCWA as your co-pilot. For more information, please contact:

Joanne Even
Client Solutions Manager
Corporate Training & Consulting
Community College Workforce Alliance
Phone: 804-897-7612
Email: jeven@ccwa.vccs.edu

In-Demand Across the Region – Certified Manufacturing Technicians

In-Demand Across the Region – Certified Manufacturing Technicians


What is a Manufacturing Technician Level 1 Certification?

The Manufacturing Technician Level 1 (MT1) certification program was developed to meet the growing employment demands of the manufacturing industry. The MT1 program addresses the core industry-wide skills standards required for skilled production occupations in all sectors of manufacturing.  The core competency areas certified are: (1) Math and Measurement, (2) Spatial Reasoning and Manufacturing Technology, and (3) Quality and Business Acumen.

The purpose of the MT1 certification program is to document individuals’ mastery of the critical competencies required for modern manufacturing production and production-related occupations.  The goals of the MT1 certification program are to:

  • Develop a workforce pipeline capable of meeting the requirements of existing and emerging employers in advanced technology industries such as manufacturing,
  • Provide a customized fast track pathway to stackable credentials for 21st Century advanced technology careers in industry,
  • Provide online and instructor-led training to address identified technical skill gaps, and
  • Provide a pathway to advanced level training and specialized training based on industry requirements for potential new hires and incumbent workers.

More on MT1

An MT1 operates precision machinery, systems and processes. Typical skills expected in these positions usually include: CAD skills, computer controlled machine programming, precision measurement, process and machine trouble-shooting, problem-solving, machine maintenance and proficient use of diagnostic and statistical tools.  These positions generally describe someone who has enough broad-based knowledge about a multi-step process to successfully troubleshoot and solve problems beyond the scope of typical “machine operators”. Sample MT1 Job Titles: Operator, Production Operator, Production Technician, Technician, Chemical Equipment Operator, Chemical Operator, Fixers, CNC Technician Manufacturing Technician and Production Manufacturing Specialist. NOTE: To review a full list of production occupations in modern manufacturing requiring MT1 industry-wide technical skills, please refer to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.


Why RVA Needs Certified Manufacturing Technicians

Manufacturing is still alive and well in the Greater Richmond region. Our local economy continues to benefit greatly from this thriving business sector, which has created more ancillary jobs in comparison to others. This is one of the primary reasons national leaders are frantically searching for new ways to bring manufacturing jobs back to the United States.

It is widely known that economies with a strong manufacturing base are more secure in other economic areas. But, the manufacturing industry is only as good as its human capital; and a large skills gap has appeared in the last decade.

Read More