Close

Search Courses & Register (804) 523-CCWA

Tag Archive for: manufacturing

Employment Signing Day

Employment Signing Day

Employment Signing Day for Prince George County High School Graduates

~Local company offers full-time positions to certified logistics specialists~

Three 2019 graduates of Prince George County High School, offered full-time employment with Standard Motor Products, Inc., were honored at a “Signing Day” ceremony at the Hopewell/Prince George Chamber of Commerce, June 11, 2019. The students, who have also earned the Certified Logistics Associate (CLA) credential from the Community College Workforce Alliance (CCWA), signed a Letter-of-Intent to accept entry-level employment as order fillers with Standard Motor Products, Inc. in Disputanta (Prince George County).

“The CLA provides candidates with a broader understanding of a significant portion of our business as well as the world economy,” said Mark Hanlon, Human Resource Manager at Standard Motor Products.   “More importantly, we utilize the CLA training as a development tool for our team leaders – the first level of leadership within our facility.  Candidates with the certification have a ‘leg up’ if they are looking for long-term career opportunities with us.”

Standard Motor Products, the Community College Workforce Alliance, and Prince George County Public Schools partnered to provide a credentialing program in warehousing and distribution logistics during the academic school year. The program provided participants with a workplace readiness skills certification, the CLA credential, employment with Standard Motor Products, and served as a sustaining a workforce development program for the company.

Hanlon added, “Our partnership with CCWA began as a method of providing internal training.  As our relationship has grown, our desire to make an impact on the local community grew and CCWA has been an integral part of our outreach efforts.  Recently, we partnered with the CCWA, Crater Workforce Development Board, the Virginia Department of Labor and Industry, and Prince George County Public Schools to create a taskforce that led to this pilot workforce development program in warehousing and distribution.”

Evan Monger, Nathan Beiro, and Jamal Berry II completed the coursework and Signing photo of studentexaminations to earn a Certified Logistics Associate credential, a program created by the Manufacturing Skill Standards Council (MSSC). These students will also graduate from Prince George High School on Saturday, June 15.

Monger, said he learned a lot about the industry in the CLA class. “While I was taking the class, I thought it would just be a good addition to my resume,” he explained. “I passed the exam with flying colors but I never thought it would lead to immediate full-time employment.” He added, “logistics is more than forklifts and pallet jacks – there is a lot of technical information.”

The CLA course trains individuals for a wide range of skills necessary for success in the logistics industry. Through this program, individuals learn safety, material handling, quality control principles, supply chain management, receiving, storage, and workplace communication skills.

“The CLA certification was developed to create a pipeline of qualified applicants in order to decrease the skills gap in the logistics workforce, and to meet the employment demands of the logistics industry,” said Dana Newcomer, CCWA’s Apprenticeship Coordinator. “With the CLA certification, students not only gain training in logistics, they also earn a nationally-recognized industry credential positioning them as qualified and competitive candidates for frontline positions in the logistics industry.”

CCWA offers the CLA course throughout the year to meet the business and employment demands. Since program inception, nearly 200 individuals have earned the CLA certification at CCWA.

CCWA Selected as Partner of the Year by The Virginia Manufacturers Association

CCWA Selected as Partner of the Year by The Virginia Manufacturers Association

~ Two-time award winner honored for training practices~

Williamsburg (VA) At the recent Workforce Solutions Symposium at Kingsmill Resort, the Virginia Manufacturers Association (VMA) announced the Community College Workforce Alliance (CCWA) as “2018 Partner of the Year.” Honored with this award for the second time (the first award presented in 2015), CCWA, the workforce development partnership between John Tyler and Reynolds community colleges, continues to enhance its manufacturing technician training and apprenticeship programs – providing a pipeline of qualified applicants for the industry’s employers in the Greater Richmond region. Virginia’s major manufacturing companies, along with regional workforce and economic development partners, attended the event earlier this month.

“CCWA recognized early the need for a pipeline of qualified job seekers and employees to decrease the skills gap in manufacturing workforce,” said Dr. Victor Gray, Executive Director of Manufacturing Skills Institute (MSi). “Since 2015, CCWA and the Virginia Manufacturers Association have worked together to incorporate the Manufacturing Technician Level 1 (MT1) certification training into the community college education system. Each year, CCWA trains hundreds of Virginians for the MT1 certification, and they were the first organization in the Commonwealth to incorporate this certification within registered apprenticeship programs.” Gray added, “This year, working with Virginia Department of Veterans Services, CCWA launched a pilot ‘Military to Manufacturing’ program, which provides transitioning service members and veterans with free MT1 certification training, on-site industrial tours, and job interviews. To date, CCWA has certified more workers and job seekers in the MT1 certification than any other workforce agency in the country, and CCWA continues to develop new employer partnerships every day.”

In a recent study released by Deloitte, data shows the United States facing a massive labor shortage for technical jobs. Over the next decade, Deloitte points out that 2.4 million jobs could remain unfilled as a result of baby boomer generation retirements. The issue could cost the U.S. over $2 trillion in missed opportunities for the economy.

“CCWA is striving to make a dent in the skills gap and labor shortage,” said Dana Newcomer, CCWA’s Apprenticeship Coordinator. “Integrating industry recognized credentials and apprenticeships into the workplace is a primary tactic we’re focusing on as an educational partner. It’s imperative we develop our younger generations to not only become interested in these promising careers, but also competent.”

According to the VMA, winning the award twice within a four-year period demonstrates CCWA’s commitment to provide vital career pipeline services and credentialing initiatives to the region.


In the Photo:
Nat Marshall and Whitney Harrison are the Workforce Solutions Committee Co-Chairs
Dr. Victor Gray, Executive Director Workforce Solution
Wes Smith, CCWA Interim AVP of Workforce Development

Mission Tomorrow 2018: CCWA’s Interactive Exhibit

Mission Tomorrow 2018: CCWA’s Interactive Exhibit

Manufacturers will continue to actively recruit qualified employees in the Greater Richmond region; and, introducing thousands of eighth graders to the industry expands CCWA’s commitment to create a pipeline for these in-demand jobs.

In its third year, ChamberRVA’s Mission Tomorrow event (October 18 & 19) gave students the opportunity to meet with more than 100 businesses as they consider their higher education and career options. CCWA delivered information about training for careers in manufacturing and hands-on demonstrations that enhance the experience of working with equipment, tools and technologies.

In-Demand Across the Region – Certified Manufacturing Technicians

In-Demand Across the Region – Certified Manufacturing Technicians


What is a Manufacturing Technician Level 1 Certification?

The Manufacturing Technician Level 1 (MT1) certification program was developed to meet the growing employment demands of the manufacturing industry. The MT1 program addresses the core industry-wide skills standards required for skilled production occupations in all sectors of manufacturing.  The core competency areas certified are: (1) Math and Measurement, (2) Spatial Reasoning and Manufacturing Technology, and (3) Quality and Business Acumen.

The purpose of the MT1 certification program is to document individuals’ mastery of the critical competencies required for modern manufacturing production and production-related occupations.  The goals of the MT1 certification program are to:

  • Develop a workforce pipeline capable of meeting the requirements of existing and emerging employers in advanced technology industries such as manufacturing,
  • Provide a customized fast track pathway to stackable credentials for 21st Century advanced technology careers in industry,
  • Provide online and instructor-led training to address identified technical skill gaps, and
  • Provide a pathway to advanced level training and specialized training based on industry requirements for potential new hires and incumbent workers.

More on MT1

An MT1 operates precision machinery, systems and processes. Typical skills expected in these positions usually include: CAD skills, computer controlled machine programming, precision measurement, process and machine trouble-shooting, problem-solving, machine maintenance and proficient use of diagnostic and statistical tools.  These positions generally describe someone who has enough broad-based knowledge about a multi-step process to successfully troubleshoot and solve problems beyond the scope of typical “machine operators”. Sample MT1 Job Titles: Operator, Production Operator, Production Technician, Technician, Chemical Equipment Operator, Chemical Operator, Fixers, CNC Technician Manufacturing Technician and Production Manufacturing Specialist. NOTE: To review a full list of production occupations in modern manufacturing requiring MT1 industry-wide technical skills, please refer to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.


Why RVA Needs Certified Manufacturing Technicians

Manufacturing is still alive and well in the Greater Richmond region. Our local economy continues to benefit greatly from this thriving business sector, which has created more ancillary jobs in comparison to others. This is one of the primary reasons national leaders are frantically searching for new ways to bring manufacturing jobs back to the United States.

It is widely known that economies with a strong manufacturing base are more secure in other economic areas. But, the manufacturing industry is only as good as its human capital; and a large skills gap has appeared in the last decade.

Read More