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Preventing Workplace Accidents in the RVA

Preventing Workplace Accidents in the RVA

Preventing Workplace Accidents in the Greater Richmond Region ~ CCWA Provides FREE OSHA-10 Construction Training to Employers! ~ By Wes Smith, Interim Assistant Vice President for Workforce Development

Accidents are one thing, but deaths in the workplace are another. Did you know that in 2017 there were 4,674 worker fatalities in private industry? To make matters worse for the construction industry, 20.7% of these deaths were construction related. OSHA has stated that the leading causes of death (excluding traffic collisions) are caused by four primary accident areas, which they’ve titled the “Fatal Four.” These include falls, struck by object, electrocution, and caught-in/between. The “Fatal Four” are responsible for 59.9% of the deaths which occur in the construction industry. That percentage is why OSHA routinely holds more inspections on construction companies vs. other sectors. In 2018, there were over 32,000 inspections completed by OSHA.

Accidents are incredibly preventable when workers and employers put an emphasis on safety and set standards and responsibilities for safety protocols. Outside of death and accidents, there’s another reason for job seekers, employees, and employers to focus on safety. Simply put, it’s bad for business. When federal OSHA inspections are completed, most companies receive multiple citations. After compiling all of the data from these citations, OSHA was able to identify the most frequent citations. These include falls, hazard communication, scaffolding, ladders, respiratory protection, lockout/tag-out, powered industrial trucks, fall protection, machine guarding, and eye and face protection.

It is for the reasons mentioned above that the Community College Workforce Alliance (CCWA) has decided to engage with industries to get more Virginians certified in relevant and life-changing credentials. OSHA-10 Construction Certification involves ten hours of instruction, and typically comes at a financial cost to the individual or the employer. This cost barrier stops many individuals from receiving training each year. It’s a proven fact that individuals who are formally trained and certified are safer in the workplace not only for themselves but for everyone around them. A safe employee adds value in many ways to a company. This is why it’s normal to see construction and industrial companies make safety a top priority.

CCWA will be hosting its first free OSHA-10 Construction training class on May 2nd & 3rd. CCWA is doing this to give back to the community it serves, as well as addressing the importance of industry credentials and life-long learning in the workplace.

If your company is interested in attending or sending staff to this free certification training, then click on the link below for registration or contact us at 804-897-7602. Stay safe out there!

Register for CCWA’s FREE OSHA Class – May 2/3
Training to Be First on the Scene

Training to Be First on the Scene

~ CCWA Kicks Off Young Adult Initiative with EMT Certification Training in Petersburg ~ By Amy Taloma

For 15 students, the Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) program is the first step to a new career in a high-demand field.  Last month, through a partnership supported by the Virginia Community College System’s Young Adult Initiative, Community College Workforce Alliance (CCWA), John Tyler Community College, and Southside Adult Education Programs, began training the partnership’s first student cohort for the EMT certification.

EMT Students Together

One remarkable facet of the class is that it is held three nights a week (6pm – 10pm) at Southside Virginia Emergency Crew (SVEC) in Petersburg (VA).  By locating the course at an active medical facility, CCWA students come into contact with EMTs and get a glimpse at the activities and atmosphere surrounding an active emergency crew.

SVEC is the primary EMS agency for the Tri-Cities area answering thousands of calls for service annually with over a million man hours accumulated to keep up with the demand. SVEC also provides other services in the region such as standbys, public events, and combined training and preparedness exercises in conjunction with other public service organizations.EMT Students working

The EMT course is unique because it follows the Plugged In Virginia model which integrates adult education and career coaching within the occupational and credential training. In this process, the students learn EMT course content two of three evenings per week. During occupational training, on the remaining class night, students work with an adult education instructor on key math, vocabulary, and study strategies.  Another key component of the course is the involvement of CCWA career coaches who teach employability skills and help students prepare for their new roles as EMTs.

Students who successfully complete the course and earn certification will be able to join the workforce as an entry-level EMT.  This model assists students who may have thought that a career in health care was unavailable to them because of their lack of educational credentials.  The program strengthens academic skills and builds student confidence while they work on attaining the EMT credential.

EMT Thank You Notes to CCWA

During the first week of class, students enrolled in the program took time to get to know each other with icebreakers. When asked about their motivation to pursue a certification, student responses ranged from a longing to help people in their community to seeking advancement opportunities within health sciences or military career fields.

CCWA Student Paris Brown says that the credential will provide him with a flexible career, not just a job – providing a public safety role and keeping people alive. Summer Brown has been trying to get this certification for the past year, but never found an affordable program that fit her schedule, until now. She is currently a lifeguard and wants to explore more health care fields, but knows this certification is a great first step to earning medical experience that will fuel her career.

With over 360 hours of training completed, CCWA’s first class of EMT students, taught by John Tyler EMT Instructor, Daniel Linkins, is now learning how to lift up to 125 pounds, and preparing for mass casualty situations – using their newly formed skills on simulated patients.  In June, the Tri-Cities region will welcome 15 highly trained EMTs onto the first response scene.

For more information on upcoming EMT courses, visit ccwatraining.org/EMT

Fall 2018 Schedule

Fall 2018 Schedule

On the path to professional growth or searching for a new career? CCWA invites you to discover how short-term training courses and certificate programs can prepare you for the next level. Fall is the perfect time to renew your educational goals and engage with experts that can help you build your professional portfolio. And learn more about the FastForward credential program where you can earn an industry-recognized certificate that leads to new opportunities in high-demand fields like healthcare, transportation and logistics, manufacturing and construction.

Browse our Fall 2018 schedule of classes (PDF of Fall 2018 Schedule) or visit our online registration for more information.

Bridge To Career – Preparing Young Adults for In-Demand Careers

Bridge To Career – Preparing Young Adults for In-Demand Careers

Community College Workforce Alliance (CCWA), Reynolds and John Tyler Community Colleges, Capital and Crater Regions’ Adult Education programs, and Goodwill of Central and Coastal Virginia are partnering to increase opportunities for young adults to rapidly gain the basic skills and credentials needed for readily available jobs offering career and wage growth.

Our Bridge to Career programs in the Greater Richmond and Crater regions provide FREE conveniently-scheduled training for occupations in demand by regional business and industry. Programs also include: basic skills, career coaching, preparation for interviews and employment, opportunities to earn industry certifications, digital literacy, and assistance finding the transportation and services participants might need to get to training and work. Participants also have placement specialists working with them to secure employment at the program’s end.

Currently offered programs train students for careers in health care, warehousing and distribution, customer service and construction occupations. Cohorts begin year-round. Programs are available for those with and without a high school diploma. Thanks to funding from several sources including the Strada Education Network, there is no charge for tuition, fees, books, supplies or support services such as transportation and childcare.

Upcoming Sessions

Reynolds Community College – Downtown Campus:

  • Construction/Trades – NCCER – Core (Sep 10 – Nov 15; Monday – Thursday; Afternoon Sessions)
  • Warehousing/Distribution – Certified Logistics Associate/CLA (Sep 17 – Nov 15; Tuesday – Thursday; Evening Sessions)

Petersburg High School:

  • Health Care – Clinical Medical Assistant (Sep 24 – Jan 31; Monday – Thursday; Evening Sessions)
  • Health Care – Nurse Aide (Sep 24 – Jan 31; Monday – Thursday; Evening Sessions)
  • Warehousing/Distribution – Certified Logistics Associate/CLA (Sep 24 – Jan 31; Monday – Thursday; Evening Sessions)

Hanover County:

  • Warehousing/Distribution – Certified Logistics Associate/CLA (Sep 17 – Nov 27; Monday – Thursday; Afternoon Sessions)

For more information on the program, please complete the form below:

2018 LogistXGames

2018 LogistXGames

FOURTH ANNUAL RICHMOND LOGISTXGAMES  TO BE HELD THURSDAY, APRIL 26

Logistics companies set to participate in friendly competition highlighting supply chain and logistics industry

(Henrico, Va.) – Greater Richmond, with its thriving distribution and warehousing industries, will play host to the 2018 RVA LogistXGames as ten local companies compete for the fourth annual regional championship.

“Last year’s games turned the spotlight onto the logistics and distribution industry in Richmond, and we will continue to do so, that’s why we’re encouraging participating and sponsorship for this year’s games,” said CBRE |Richmond Vice President and LogistXGames co-chair Wood Thornton.

The 2018 RVA LogistXGames will be held at Deepwater Industrial Park at 3205 Commerce Road on April 26 (10:00am to 1:00pm).

The games serve as a healthy competition between prominent companies who are involved in the movement of goods between source and consumer, and paths all along the way. Representatives of CBRE |Richmond, Liberty Property Trust, the Community College Workforce Alliance (CCWA), and The Port of Virginia have organized this event.

How do the games work?

There are four events in the 2018 competition. They are each designed to test the teamwork, talent, efficiency and speed of each competing company. The games mirror the types of environments which logistics professionals work, but they are presented with a “twist.” Those games are:

  • Pallet Puzzle Sprint – Three-person teams each take 36 different-sized corrugated boxes from floor locations, assemble them and stack them on a pallet. The team with the quickest time wins.
  • Pallet Jack Relay – Three-person teams participate in a timed pallet jack relay race through an obstacle course while keeping the boxes on the pallet.
  • Pick/Pack Hurdle – Three-person teams move boxes from the pallet to a warehouse racking system while memorizing positioning and SKUs in a timed race.
  • Box Put –Teams will have packed one box with fragile bottled liquid items, in the Pallet Puzzle Sprint event, utilizing selected packaging material from various options. During the Box Put event, one team member will then throw the box for distance and accuracy without breaking the contents.

An objective group of volunteers will serve as judges for the competition. The winning company will receive the “Golden Pallet” award.

Why Hold the LogistXGames?

First held in 2007 in Louisville, Ky., the games were created as a means for participating companies to build employee pride, foster teamwork principles and reinforce safety standards.

Teams playing, as of April 18, 2018, include:

  • CCWA
  • Riverside Logistics
  • McKesson
  • The Port of Virginia
  • Worth Higgins & Associates
  • Total Packaging Services
  • AutoPartSource
  • Lutron
  • PD Systems
  • Goodwill

Sponsors include: CBRE|Richmond, The Port of Virginia, Virginia Credit Union Arbon|Rite Hite, Panattoni, Capital Region Workforce Development Board, Becknell Industrial, Liberty Property Trust, Alpha Systems, Chesterfield Economic Development, Crown Lifts, Dominion Energy, Greater Richmond Partnership, Hanover County Economic Development Authority, Henrico County Economic Development Authority, Hood Container, Hourigan Development, Lutron, Manufacturing Skills Institute, Peaklogix, Potbelly Sandwich Shop, Richmond Economic Development Authority, Riverside Logistics, SignCrafters, TK Promotions, Total Packaging Services, Williams Mullen and Worth Higgins & Associates. Tax deductible contributions will be designated for workforce development efforts including logistics/operation management industry training offered by CCWA.

For more information about the 2018 RVA LogistXGames, call/email Laura Bradshaw at (804) 267-7253 (laura.bradshaw@cbre-richmond.com) or Nina Sims at (804) 523-2289 (nsims@ccwa.vccs.edu).


To join us in person, register here:

About CBRE – Richmond

CBRE|Richmond is a CBRE, Inc. affiliate office serving the Central Virginia region. The firm assists real estate owners, investors and occupiers by offering strategic advice and execution for property leasing and sales; property, facilities and project management; corporate services; debt and equity financing; investment management; valuation and appraisal; research and investment strategy; and consulting. In 2017, the Richmond office completed 390 lease transactions encompassing 5.8 million square feet totaling $364 million, and 89 sales transactions valuing $435 million. For more information about the Richmond office, visit www.cbre.us/richmond.

About Community College Workforce Alliance (CCWA)

The Community College Workforce Alliance (CCWA) is building the region’s workforce as a partnership between J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College and John Tyler Community Colleges – serving four cities and 12 counties of Central Virginia. The organization provides non-credit training, customized instruction, consulting and educational programs for more than 10,000 class participants representing over 900 employers in the region annually. CCWA coordinates at three training facilities in the region (Henrico, Midlothian and Chester), online and at the job sites of employers. Visit www.ccwatraining.org for more information on courses and services.

Media Contacts:

Nina Sims
Director, Marketing
Community College Workforce Alliance (CCWA)
O: (804) 523-2289; C: (804) 356-3962
nsims@ccwa.vccs.edu

 

Laura Bradshaw
Brokerage Coordinator
CBRE | Richmond
O: (804) 267-7253; C: (804) 605-3702
laura.bradshaw@cbre-richmond.com

CCWA Supports Wage Gains with Workforce Credentials

CCWA Supports Wage Gains with Workforce Credentials

When training is aligned with high-demand occupational fields, it creates the perfect opportunity for job seekers to gain skills and earn credentials for occupations that will offer them higher wages.  Those with jobs may be looking to jumpstart a new career in education or manufacturing.  Those transitioning from military service may need training for credentials that provide access to occupations such as health care.  And high school graduates may want workforce training that can get them a job, and also a few credits towards a college credential.  CCWA offers training for nationally-recognized industry credentials in manufacturing, construction and transportation, logistics and warehousing, health care, education and business services. As of January (2018), CCWA has enrolled 1181 students in training for workforce credentials with 714 of those students having completed their training and already earned credentials.  There are even CCWA programs that allow job seekers to combine GED preparation and training for a high growth occupation.

Last week, Virginia’s Community Colleges reported significant statewide outcomes, on impact of the program on participant wages, for the first year of the Workforce Credential Grant.

Read more below from Virginia’s Community Colleges:

Tuesday, February 6, 2018
Early Wage Data Reveals Strong Gains for Workforce Credentials Grant Recipients

RICHMOND – Virginians taking advantage of a new state grants program for workforce training are graduating and being hired into careers that typically increase their take-home pay between 25 percent and 50 percent, and even higher in some cases. Those statistics represent a first look at the wage data of those who used Virginia’s New Economy Workforce Credentials Grants to earn FastForward credentials at a Virginia Community College.

“Businesses are lining up to hire workers with the right skills, and the salary increases are transforming the lives of Virginia families,” said Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges.

PROMISING EARLY NUMBERS
Since the program’s inception, some 4,500 Virginians have used the grants to earn credentials in about 40 high-demand occupations. The average grant recipient is 36 years old, with an annual salary of $22,000 upon entering the program. Two out of three are new to community college education; and 20 percent received some form of public assistance in the year before the grants program began.

Early indicators show welders are seeing some of the biggest increases, up 50 percent. Manufacturers (31 percent), commercial truck drivers (33 percent), and healthcare administrators (23 percent) represent occupations with strong income growth. Construction and power line workers, and certified nursing assistants are also showing strong gains.

Wage analysis compares the program participant’s income before entering a program and the annualized salary earned for two or more quarters after earning a credential. Researchers say wage data from additional program graduates will allow for deeper analysis of these and other occupations.

SURPASSING EXPECTATIONS
“The success of Virginia’s Workforce Credentials Grants has surpassed even our most optimistic expectations,” noted Del. Kathy J. Byron (R-Bedford), sponsor of the House of Delegates legislation to enact the program. “This program is changing lives and transforming our workforce as a result.”

“Those with certifications have quickly found employment with family-supporting wages,” said state Sen. Frank Ruff (R-Clarksville), sponsor of the state Senate legislation. “And we expect each reporting period will yield further results. This is a win for employers and students.”

Virginia’s median income for those 25 and older stood at $42,000 in 2016, which represents a 2.1 percent increase from 2014, and a 4.8 percent increase from 2012. As the program name suggests, FastForward credentials are among the quickest way for an individual to elevate his or her career prospects.

CRUCIAL TO BUSINESSES
“We are pleased to see that the FastForward program is off to a successful start,” said Barry DuVal, president and CEO of the Virginia Chamber of Commerce. “The availability of high-demand credential and degree programs is crucial to the businesses who employ these workers and to growing our economy. We look forward to working with public policy leaders to build on the program’s capacity.”

“Demand is high among both the businesses looking to fill these jobs, and the individuals seeking opportunity,” said DuBois. “The beauty of the program’s pay-for-performance nature is that money is spent only when results are achieved. This is a direct investment in Virginia’s workforce, and a boost for its competitiveness.”

MEETING GREATER DEMAND
The Virginia General Assembly created the grants program in 2016, allocating $12.5 million for the program’s first two years. The pay-for-performance program sold out early each year, exhausting the grant funding. The 2018 introduced biennial budget included $9.5 million for the grants in each of the next two years. Concerned over the high demand for the grants, business leaders and community college officials are working with legislators to further increase the funding.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 252,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

About FastForward: A high-demand program helping Virginians get the jobs they want and the salaries they need, FastForward programs are short-term training courses offered through Virginia’s Community Colleges to help you fast-track your career for 40 different occupations. State grants and other forms of financial assistance may be available for program applicants. For more information, please visit www.FastForwardVa.org.

SOURCE: http://www.vccs.edu/newsroom-articles/early-wage-data-reveals-strong-gains-for-workforce-credentials-grant-recipients/

VCCS MEDIA CONTACT: Jeffrey Kraus
Asst. Vice Chancellor for Strategic Communications
(804) 592-6767
jkraus@vccs.edu