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2018 LogistXGames

2018 LogistXGames

FOURTH ANNUAL RICHMOND LOGISTXGAMES  TO BE HELD THURSDAY, APRIL 26

Logistics companies set to participate in friendly competition highlighting supply chain and logistics industry

(Henrico, Va.) – Greater Richmond, with its thriving distribution and warehousing industries, will play host to the 2018 RVA LogistXGames as ten local companies compete for the fourth annual regional championship.

“Last year’s games turned the spotlight onto the logistics and distribution industry in Richmond, and we will continue to do so, that’s why we’re encouraging participating and sponsorship for this year’s games,” said CBRE |Richmond Vice President and LogistXGames co-chair Wood Thornton.

The 2018 RVA LogistXGames will be held at Deepwater Industrial Park at 3205 Commerce Road on April 26 (10:00am to 1:00pm).

The games serve as a healthy competition between prominent companies who are involved in the movement of goods between source and consumer, and paths all along the way. Representatives of CBRE |Richmond, Liberty Property Trust, the Community College Workforce Alliance (CCWA), and The Port of Virginia have organized this event.

How do the games work?

There are four events in the 2018 competition. They are each designed to test the teamwork, talent, efficiency and speed of each competing company. The games mirror the types of environments which logistics professionals work, but they are presented with a “twist.” Those games are:

  • Pallet Puzzle Sprint – Three-person teams each take 36 different-sized corrugated boxes from floor locations, assemble them and stack them on a pallet. The team with the quickest time wins.
  • Pallet Jack Relay – Three-person teams participate in a timed pallet jack relay race through an obstacle course while keeping the boxes on the pallet.
  • Pick/Pack Hurdle – Three-person teams move boxes from the pallet to a warehouse racking system while memorizing positioning and SKUs in a timed race.
  • Box Put –Teams will have packed one box with fragile bottled liquid items, in the Pallet Puzzle Sprint event, utilizing selected packaging material from various options. During the Box Put event, one team member will then throw the box for distance and accuracy without breaking the contents.

An objective group of volunteers will serve as judges for the competition. The winning company will receive the “Golden Pallet” award.

Why Hold the LogistXGames?

First held in 2007 in Louisville, Ky., the games were created as a means for participating companies to build employee pride, foster teamwork principles and reinforce safety standards.

Teams playing, as of April 18, 2018, include:

  • CCWA
  • Riverside Logistics
  • McKesson
  • The Port of Virginia
  • Worth Higgins & Associates
  • Total Packaging Services
  • AutoPartSource
  • Lutron
  • PD Systems
  • Goodwill

Sponsors include: CBRE|Richmond, The Port of Virginia, Virginia Credit Union Arbon|Rite Hite, Panattoni, Capital Region Workforce Development Board, Becknell Industrial, Liberty Property Trust, Alpha Systems, Chesterfield Economic Development, Crown Lifts, Dominion Energy, Greater Richmond Partnership, Hanover County Economic Development Authority, Henrico County Economic Development Authority, Hood Container, Hourigan Development, Lutron, Manufacturing Skills Institute, Peaklogix, Potbelly Sandwich Shop, Richmond Economic Development Authority, Riverside Logistics, SignCrafters, TK Promotions, Total Packaging Services, Williams Mullen and Worth Higgins & Associates. Tax deductible contributions will be designated for workforce development efforts including logistics/operation management industry training offered by CCWA.

For more information about the 2018 RVA LogistXGames, call/email Laura Bradshaw at (804) 267-7253 (laura.bradshaw@cbre-richmond.com) or Nina Sims at (804) 523-2289 (nsims@ccwa.vccs.edu).


To join us in person, register here:

About CBRE – Richmond

CBRE|Richmond is a CBRE, Inc. affiliate office serving the Central Virginia region. The firm assists real estate owners, investors and occupiers by offering strategic advice and execution for property leasing and sales; property, facilities and project management; corporate services; debt and equity financing; investment management; valuation and appraisal; research and investment strategy; and consulting. In 2017, the Richmond office completed 390 lease transactions encompassing 5.8 million square feet totaling $364 million, and 89 sales transactions valuing $435 million. For more information about the Richmond office, visit www.cbre.us/richmond.

About Community College Workforce Alliance (CCWA)

The Community College Workforce Alliance (CCWA) is building the region’s workforce as a partnership between J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College and John Tyler Community Colleges – serving four cities and 12 counties of Central Virginia. The organization provides non-credit training, customized instruction, consulting and educational programs for more than 10,000 class participants representing over 900 employers in the region annually. CCWA coordinates at three training facilities in the region (Henrico, Midlothian and Chester), online and at the job sites of employers. Visit www.ccwatraining.org for more information on courses and services.

Media Contacts:

Nina Sims
Director, Marketing
Community College Workforce Alliance (CCWA)
O: (804) 523-2289; C: (804) 356-3962
nsims@ccwa.vccs.edu

 

Laura Bradshaw
Brokerage Coordinator
CBRE | Richmond
O: (804) 267-7253; C: (804) 605-3702
laura.bradshaw@cbre-richmond.com

CCWA Supports Wage Gains with Workforce Credentials

CCWA Supports Wage Gains with Workforce Credentials

When training is aligned with high-demand occupational fields, it creates the perfect opportunity for job seekers to gain skills and earn credentials for occupations that will offer them higher wages.  Those with jobs may be looking to jumpstart a new career in education or manufacturing.  Those transitioning from military service may need training for credentials that provide access to occupations such as health care.  And high school graduates may want workforce training that can get them a job, and also a few credits towards a college credential.  CCWA offers training for nationally-recognized industry credentials in manufacturing, construction and transportation, logistics and warehousing, health care, education and business services. As of January (2018), CCWA has enrolled 1181 students in training for workforce credentials with 714 of those students having completed their training and already earned credentials.  There are even CCWA programs that allow job seekers to combine GED preparation and training for a high growth occupation.

Last week, Virginia’s Community Colleges reported significant statewide outcomes, on impact of the program on participant wages, for the first year of the Workforce Credential Grant.

Read more below from Virginia’s Community Colleges:

Tuesday, February 6, 2018
Early Wage Data Reveals Strong Gains for Workforce Credentials Grant Recipients

RICHMOND – Virginians taking advantage of a new state grants program for workforce training are graduating and being hired into careers that typically increase their take-home pay between 25 percent and 50 percent, and even higher in some cases. Those statistics represent a first look at the wage data of those who used Virginia’s New Economy Workforce Credentials Grants to earn FastForward credentials at a Virginia Community College.

“Businesses are lining up to hire workers with the right skills, and the salary increases are transforming the lives of Virginia families,” said Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges.

PROMISING EARLY NUMBERS
Since the program’s inception, some 4,500 Virginians have used the grants to earn credentials in about 40 high-demand occupations. The average grant recipient is 36 years old, with an annual salary of $22,000 upon entering the program. Two out of three are new to community college education; and 20 percent received some form of public assistance in the year before the grants program began.

Early indicators show welders are seeing some of the biggest increases, up 50 percent. Manufacturers (31 percent), commercial truck drivers (33 percent), and healthcare administrators (23 percent) represent occupations with strong income growth. Construction and power line workers, and certified nursing assistants are also showing strong gains.

Wage analysis compares the program participant’s income before entering a program and the annualized salary earned for two or more quarters after earning a credential. Researchers say wage data from additional program graduates will allow for deeper analysis of these and other occupations.

SURPASSING EXPECTATIONS
“The success of Virginia’s Workforce Credentials Grants has surpassed even our most optimistic expectations,” noted Del. Kathy J. Byron (R-Bedford), sponsor of the House of Delegates legislation to enact the program. “This program is changing lives and transforming our workforce as a result.”

“Those with certifications have quickly found employment with family-supporting wages,” said state Sen. Frank Ruff (R-Clarksville), sponsor of the state Senate legislation. “And we expect each reporting period will yield further results. This is a win for employers and students.”

Virginia’s median income for those 25 and older stood at $42,000 in 2016, which represents a 2.1 percent increase from 2014, and a 4.8 percent increase from 2012. As the program name suggests, FastForward credentials are among the quickest way for an individual to elevate his or her career prospects.

CRUCIAL TO BUSINESSES
“We are pleased to see that the FastForward program is off to a successful start,” said Barry DuVal, president and CEO of the Virginia Chamber of Commerce. “The availability of high-demand credential and degree programs is crucial to the businesses who employ these workers and to growing our economy. We look forward to working with public policy leaders to build on the program’s capacity.”

“Demand is high among both the businesses looking to fill these jobs, and the individuals seeking opportunity,” said DuBois. “The beauty of the program’s pay-for-performance nature is that money is spent only when results are achieved. This is a direct investment in Virginia’s workforce, and a boost for its competitiveness.”

MEETING GREATER DEMAND
The Virginia General Assembly created the grants program in 2016, allocating $12.5 million for the program’s first two years. The pay-for-performance program sold out early each year, exhausting the grant funding. The 2018 introduced biennial budget included $9.5 million for the grants in each of the next two years. Concerned over the high demand for the grants, business leaders and community college officials are working with legislators to further increase the funding.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 252,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

About FastForward: A high-demand program helping Virginians get the jobs they want and the salaries they need, FastForward programs are short-term training courses offered through Virginia’s Community Colleges to help you fast-track your career for 40 different occupations. State grants and other forms of financial assistance may be available for program applicants. For more information, please visit www.FastForwardVa.org.

SOURCE: http://www.vccs.edu/newsroom-articles/early-wage-data-reveals-strong-gains-for-workforce-credentials-grant-recipients/

VCCS MEDIA CONTACT: Jeffrey Kraus
Asst. Vice Chancellor for Strategic Communications
(804) 592-6767
jkraus@vccs.edu

The Enrollment Roller-Coaster

The Enrollment Roller-Coaster

~Numbers fall in a rising economy, but college continues to train students to meet workforce needs~

The following content, courtesy of Virginia Business:

Reynolds students

While it has three campuses, half of the students take some classes online. Courtesy Reynolds Community College

At the opening convocation of J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College in late September, President Gary Rhodes listened to the school’s alma mater, introduced and recognized other guests and college board members gathered on the college’s Henrico County campus.

Rhodes noted that the college foundation had, among other moves, awarded $500,000 in student scholarships while raising money for a new IV pump for the health-care programs, a 3-D printer for engineering and a drone for horticulture studies. He also went over some improvements at the college’s three campuses in Henrico, Goochland counties and Richmond.

Then, under a PowerPoint slide headlined “Challenges,” Rhodes dropped a bombshell. “Enrollments are down 25 percent over the past five years,” he said. The audience greeted the revelations with silence.

Later, Rhodes said that, while he was not offering excuses for the drop in enrollment, the dynamics under which community colleges operate explain a lot about what happened.

In 2012, when Virginia’s economy still was clawing its way out of the Great Recession, Reynolds hit an enrollment high of more than 20,000 students. Many sought workplace skills to help them find new jobs or careers.

Now, with Richmond’s unemployment hovering at 4 percent or less, enrollment has dipped to 16,800 or so. People are less likely to enroll in college when they have jobs and things are good, Rhodes notes.

He says the formula for the roller coaster that community colleges ride in enrollments is simple. “Weak economy equals strong enrollments. Strong economy equals weak enrollments,” he explains.

Every year, Rhodes says, the college makes “a conservative guesstimate” of what its enrollment will be. If enrollment falls, and the cash flow from tuitions is lower than expected, faculty and staff are not replaced if they leave or various programs are merged.

“Ultimately, we want to have healthy enrollment, and it’s not just the money side. It’s the workers,” Rhodes says. “Pick any industry out there, and they’re just screaming that they can’t find trained workers.”

Students from 42 countries
Preparing those workers is a top priority for Reynolds and other community colleges. Students obtain industry certification, earn associate degrees or transfer to four-year institutions for more education. On average, about 900 students transfer each year from Reynolds.

Rhodes, a former board chair of the Greater Richmond Chamber of Commerce (now, ChamberRVA), says his favorite data point — one that nearly always gets an audience’s attention — is this: “One out of every four workers in the Greater Richmond region has attended Reynolds Community College, and one in every three health-care workers,” Rhodes says, citing a study by the Richmond-based SIR consulting firm.

Since Reynolds opened in 1972, it has become the third-largest community college in Virginia (behind Northern Virginia and Tidewater community colleges), and officials say that more than 310,000 students have enrolled in for-credit courses.

Today, half of Reynolds students are taking one or more classes online, and 17 percent are earning all of their credits online. This fall, the student body included representatives from 42 foreign countries, including war-torn Afghanistan.

Besides fluctuations in the economy, Rhodes cites other factors that affect enrollment.

Low birth rates 18 years ago led to fewer U.S. students entering college in 2017. Also, state funding has dwindled over the years from 60 percent to 35 percent of Reynolds’ operational budgets, Rhodes says. As a result, tuitions are higher, and students have to shoulder more of the costs.

To boost its student body, Reynolds is making the enrollment process simpler and engaging more students while they are still in high school or middle school, through programs such as Advance College Academies. Under that program, outstanding high school students can earn associate degrees while completing their high-school diploma requirements.

The program has set up an interesting dynamic for its high school seniors. They are awarded their associate degrees in May before they receive their high-school diplomas in June. “They graduate from college before they graduate from high school,” Rhodes says with a laugh. In 2017, 63 high school students graduated from the program.

Students typically apply to an academy program in the eighth grade through their local school division, enroll in advanced high-school courses in the ninth and 10th grades and take the required college coursework for their associate degrees during the 11th and 12th grades. “They will stay together all four years,” Rhodes says of students in the program.

JLARC report
Community colleges are likely to come under scrutiny at the next session of the General Assembly as the result of a report issued in September by the state Joint Legislative Audit and Review Commission (JLARC).

Among other findings, JLARC reported that only 39 percent of Virginia’s community college students earned degrees or other credentials, a trend in line with patterns seen across the nation.

JLARC also says that the process and resources enabling community college students to transfer to four-year institutions are difficult to use.

JLARC adds that rising tuition rates and fees at community colleges could affect access, affordability and student success. During the past 10 years, tuition and fees have grown from 6 percent of per-capita disposable income to 11 percent, the report says.

Echoing comments by community college Chancellor Glenn DuBois, Rhodes notes that, while there is room for improvement, many of the issues raised by JLARC can be traced to the different populations served by community colleges and four-year institutions. Generally speaking, community college students are older, poorer and attend college part time, Rhodes says. “Seventy-five percent of our students are part time,” the Reynolds president says, “and 75 percent work.”

Workforce development
While Reynolds has seen an overall drop in enrollment, students have been rushing to enter the college’s workforce development program for high-demand fields, such as welding, manufacturing and health care.

“The Community College Workforce Alliance, which is a partnership of Reynolds and John Tyler [Community College], was No. 1 in the state for workforce credential attainment, No. 1 for the number of people we have enrolled in the program,” says Elizabeth Creamer, vice president for workforce development at Reynolds.

As of mid-September, more than 900 students have been through the program under the Reynolds/Tyler alliance. The principal driver of the program has been the Workforce Credential Grant, established by the legislature, which has just completed its first year.

Under the grant, the state pays two-thirds of the tuition costs directly to the college, with students responsible for the other third. But requirements are stringent. The college is paid a third of the cost only when a student successfully completes the course, and the final third is received only if the student successfully obtains a credential or certification from an industry or certifying agency.

The bar also is high even before the first dollar is paid. “You can only get a credential through the state at greatly reduced or no cost if it’s aligned with a regionally available job for which there is a documented shortage of workers,” Creamer says.

Besides preparing students for high-demand occupations, the program also certifies teachers.

Those teachers, who must already possess a bachelor’s degree before they enter the program, are largely destined for public schools in subject areas where instructors are hard to find: technical education, science and technology, engineering technology and mathematics.

“We’re not going to get the teachers in the fields we need through the teacher education programs at the universities,” Creamer says. “So, we have expedited programs for those who have a baccalaureate and who are willing and able to go into teaching. They can access that job now and get their teaching credentials in a matter of months, not years.”

Transfer students
Reynolds also transfers about 900 students annually to four-year institutions. One of them was Sofia Duarte, whose parents operate a small residential cleaning service in the Richmond area.

Duarte, now 21, says she chose to go to a community college to save on higher-education costs — about $20,000 less when a student first goes to a community college and then transfers — and to help ensure that her parents had enough money to help her younger sister.

Duarte, an honors student, earned scholarships at Reynolds, worked a variety of part-time jobs, and then transferred to Virginia Commonwealth University where she is now a senior in the School of Engineering, earning a degree in electrical engineering. “Honestly, for me Reynolds opened a lot of doors to meet amazing people and have amazing opportunities,” Duarte says. She says Reynolds offered small classes, good teachers and strong academic advising.

And her younger sister, Sabrina, 18, whom she mentored, has done okay, too. She’s now enrolled at the University of Richmond, on scholarship.

Rhodes, who is now in his 16th year as president of Reynolds, says he knows enrollments will continue to fluctuate as the economy fluctuates. But that’s not what concerns him most.

He is worried about many young people and adults — from underemployed baccalaureate degree holders who can’t find jobs in their field to high school dropouts to laid-off workers — who could benefit from the wide variety of programs offered by Reynolds. “Everything we do here at the community college is preparing people for life and careers,” Rhodes says.


Content credit: Gary Robertson, Virginia Business
Photo credit for students and Dr. Rhodes: Reynolds Community College
Photo credit for Elizabeth Creamer: Shandell Taylor
Original Article: http://www.virginiabusiness.com/news/article/the-enrollment-roller-coaster

Find Your Path and Move Ahead: Fall Schedule

Find Your Path and Move Ahead: Fall Schedule

Fall into a season of learning and build your skills, to boost job performance or land a new position. CCWA’s fall catalog is full of short-term classes or certification programs, offered at our three convenient locations and online. And learn more about our Workforce Credential Grant (WCG) program offering industry-recognized certificate programs for one-third of the cost to help you with a new career in high-demand fields throughout the region.

Take a look at our new catalog or visit us at ccwatraining.org for more information.

Download a PDF of the full catalog: CCWA Fall 2017 Schedule.

Governor McAuliffe Announces 2,173 Credentials Awarded Through New Economy Workforce Credentials Grant Program

Governor McAuliffe Announces 2,173 Credentials Awarded Through New Economy Workforce Credentials Grant Program

~ New grants spur big gains in Virginia Community Colleges’ Workforce Credential Training Programs ~

RICHMOND – Governor Terry McAuliffe announced Monday that, through the New Economy Workforce Credentials Grant program, Virginia’s Community Colleges provided workforce training that enabled 2,173 Virginians to secure industry-recognized credentials, licenses, and certifications needed for high-demand careers, in the first year of the grant program. Governor McAuliffe awarded the 2,172nd and 2,173rd credentials at an event commemorating this achievement this afternoon.

This milestone nearly triples the number of people who were credentialed last year, bringing the total to 4,268 Virginians. More than half of the credential earners, 2,173, took advantage of the New Economy Workforce Credentials Grant program. Training for the remaining 2,095 credentials was funded by employers, federal grants, or other private sources.

“Today’s announcement is a landmark achievement for our workforce development efforts,” said Governor Terry McAuliffe speaking at the announcement event. “Clearly, the timing was right for this innovative initiative to help our businesses find qualified workers and empower more Virginians to seek good-paying jobs. In partnership with the General Assembly and our public and private sector partners, we are filling key gaps in the workforce pipeline and putting more Virginians to work in the new Virginia economy.”

“Whether we’re attracting new businesses to Virginia or helping our existing employers grow and compete, we need to continually strengthen our workforce,” said Secretary of Commerce and Trade Todd Haymore. “Today’s announcement marks a nearly 180 percent increase in earned credentials in the first year of this program. This significant growth is a great sign for what we can do for Virginia’s workforce moving forward.”

With broad bipartisan support, the 2016 General Assembly created the New Economy Workforce Credential Grant Fund and program to encourage more Virginians to prepare for careers that require specialized training, but not necessarily college degrees. This fund provides grants covering two-thirds of the tuition for students who are enrolled in a workforce training program designed to fill in-demand jobs in their home region. The year before the new workforce training grant program went into effect, community colleges provided training for 1,528 Virginians to earn those professional credentials.

“This success is a tribute to the power of collaboration,” said Glenn DuBois, Chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges. “As we ramped up our workforce training capacity to respond to the new state grants program, we also created new training opportunities that motivated students to tap into a variety of other funding sources.”

“This is a significant milestone in Virginia’s efforts to better align the workforce system to help close the skills gap and prepare Virginians for good careers in high priority industries,” added Mark Herzog, Chair of the Virginia Board of Workforce Development.

Virginia’s businesses are eager to hire workers with a wide variety of skills in fields ranging from information technology and advanced manufacturing to education, health care, logistics and transportation. By pursuing industry-recognized credentials, students can qualify for promising careers in weeks or months instead of semesters and years, and without incurring large amounts of student debt.

“Through better and more accessible training, Virginia is boosting its ability to create a 21st century workforce,” said Barry DuVal, President and CEO of the Virginia Chamber of Commerce. “This is great news for our business community and for people who are starting out or getting a fresh start on their careers.”

Now entering its second year of operation, Virginia’s New Economy Workforce Credential Grant program greatly reduces the out-of-pocket cost for Virginians to enroll in specified training programs to earn industry-recognized certifications. The Virginia Board of Workforce Development has developed a list of high-demand occupations, which is further vetted as educators work closely with Virginia businesses in regions across the Commonwealth to develop and deliver related workforce training to prepare people for those jobs. Currently, grants are available to support 146 training courses offered throughout Virginia’s 23 community colleges.
To learn more about workforce credential grants, please visit http://www.vccs.edu/workforce/.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 252,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

###

Charlotte Gomer
Office of Governor Terence R. McAuliffe
Press Assistant
Charlotte.Gomer@governor.virginia.gov


Content credit: Office of the Governor.

Photo credit: Clement Britt, Virginia’s Community Colleges

Learn more about the workforce certificates offered at CCWA by visiting http://ccwatraining.org/certifications/.

Are you engaging your employees?

Are you engaging your employees?

Investing in talent development for your employees benefits your bottom line.
You’ve probably heard this paradox:
What if we train them, and they leave?
What if we don’t, and they stay?

Where does your organization stand on these questions?

The 2017 Gallup State of the American Workplace report asserts that “the key to an organization’s growth has been and always will be its workforce.” Employee retention and engagement are more than buzz words; they are critical components of the overall performance of an organization.

According to Gallup, “The desire to learn and grow is a natural human need and one that is required to keep employees motivated and progressing. When employees feel they are learning and growing, they work harder and more efficiently. And the best employees are never quite satisfied with their work. They always strive to find better, more productive ways to work. In this kind of work environment, innovation emerges. When people grow, companies evolve and grow and are more likely to stay in business.”

Renee Gendron, in a blog for the Association of Talent Development, writes that employers can be proactive and intentional about the professional growth of their employees. According to Gendron, “When employers develop their own talent, not only are they saving money because they have lower turnover rates, but they are also developing their own internal leadership skills.” Building leaders from within helps to create stronger teams in an improved culture of development.

Likewise, a recent Robert Half blog entry discusses some reasons why investing in employee growth is a smart idea. They suggest that professional development will:

  • Increase collective knowledge of your team
  • Boost job satisfaction
  • Attract the right kind of job candidates during recruitment
  • Enhance the organization’s appeal to prospective and incumbent employees
  • Identify future leaders from within the organization
  • Increase retention

“Unfortunately,… many organizations spend more on recruiting new talent than developing the top talent they already have; that has to change in order for companies to be successful in a tight talent market.”

— Joyce Maroney
Kronos Incorporated & Director of the Workforce Institute

CCWA partners with hundreds of employers each year to offer a wide range of professional development services to engage your team. Our custom-designed programs may begin with an assessment, followed by the creation of tools to fill performance gaps; then, we can provide training and coaching solutions that allow your employees to reach their full potential. If you’re interested in learning more about CCWA’s client services, please contact:

Joyce Lapsley
Client Solutions Manager
Community College Workforce Alliance
Phone: 804-706-5180
Email: JLapsley@ccwa.vccs.edu